Cavalier-du-moulin Park

The Cavalier-du-moulin Park

In 1663, Simon Denys of La Trinité built a mill on a rocky mound called Mount Carmel, on the site of the present Cavalier-du-Moulin park. In 1693, this mill is integrated into a defensive work called Cavalier. By bringing the line of fortifications back to the west in 1755, the rider lost his mill and strategic value at the same time.

A unique look over the Vieux-Québec
Source: City of Québec

Old Quebec reproduced with 4.9 billion pixels

The best view of Quebec is from Levis. This very high definition panorama has been created with 320 different photos. The final image has 4.5 billion pixels. Zoom into the image and observe the fine detail of the Chateau Frontenac, the shore of the St. Lawrence River any building from this beautiful area of Quebec.

High definition of the Québec bridge

Québec Bridge

This image of the Quebec Bridge was photographed at 800mm. This image was made from 120 pictures of 36 megapixels. These 1.5 billion pixels depict the state of this “wonder of the world” in 2016. Zoom into the image to reveal fine details.

The Quebec Bridge (Pont de Québec in French) is a road, rail and pedestrian bridge across the lower Saint Lawrence River to the west of Quebec City, and Lévis, Quebec, Canada. The project failed twice, at the cost of 88 lives, and took over 30 years to complete.

The Quebec Bridge is a riveted steel truss structure and is 987 m (3,239 ft) long, 29 m (94 ft) wide, and 104 m (340 ft) high. Cantilever arms 177 m (580 ft) long support a 195 m (640 ft) central structure, for a total span of 549 m (1800 ft), still the longest cantilever bridge span in the world. (It was the all-categories longest span in the world until the Ambassador Bridge was completed in 1929.) It is the easternmost (farthest downstream) complete crossing of the Saint Lawrence.

The Quebec Bridge was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1995.
Source: Wikipedia

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux

Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada

The Chateau St. Louis in Quebec City was the official residence of the French Governor of New France and later the British Governor of Quebec, the Governor-General of British North America, and the Lieutenant-Governor of Lower Canada.

The site was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 2002.

It is the historic site that certainly worth a visit.

Source: Wikipedia

For additional information about this site, go the page of Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux National Historic Site of Canada.