Submarine NCSM Onondaga

NCSM ONONDAGA

The Onondaga project is a project of the Pointe-au-Père Maritime Historical Site (SHMP), a museum located in Rimouski, Quebec, Canada, to convert HMCS Onondaga, a submarine of the Royal Canadian Navy, disarmed in June 2000. Launched by the Canadian War Museum (CWM) in 2000, the Onondaga conversion project was abandoned by the museum in 2002 due to a lack of funding. The SHMP, which has been interested in a museum submarine project since 2000, is conducting a feasibility study in 2003 demonstrating the potential for profitability of the project and acquired Onondaga in 2005.

In 2006, the SHMP began working with governments to finance the project and meet environmental requirements. It also identifies the submarine installation site, parallel to the Pointe-au-Père wharf. This choice entails an increase in installation costs, forcing the museum to reduce the concept of the exhibition and to develop a haulage method using a rail to reduce costs. The SHMP finally gets financial support from governments in early 2008.

Source: Wikipedia

Village of Percé

PERCÉ (the panorama of the Rocher Percé from the road stop is in high definition. Zoom in the picture)

Percé is a small city near the tip of the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec, Canada. Within the territory of the city there is a village community also called Percé.

Percé, member of the association of Most Beautiful Villages of Quebec, is mainly a tourist location particularly well known for the attractions of Percé Rock and Bonaventure Island.

In addition to Percé itself, the town’s territory also includes the communities of Barachois, Belle-Anse, Bougainville, Bridgeville, Cap-d’Espoir, Cannes-de-Roches, Coin-du-Banc, L’Anse-à-Beaufils, Pointe-Saint-Pierre, Rameau, Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, and Val-d’Espoir.

Percé is the seat of the judicial district of Gaspé.

Source: Wikipedia

Bark Europe in Québec

The Europa is a steel-hulled barque registered in the Netherlands. Originally it was a German lightship, named Senator Brockes and built in 1911 at the H.C. Stülcken & Sohn shipyard in Hamburg, Germany. Until 1977, it was in use by the German Federal Coast Guard as a lightship on the river Elbe. A Dutchman bought the vessel (or what was left of her) in 1985 and in 1994 she was fully restored as a barque, a three-mast rigged vessel, and retrofitted for special-purpose sail-training.
Source: Wikipedia

Atyla at RDV2017 – Québec City

Tall ship Atyla is a two-masted wooden schooner handmade in Spain between 1980 and 1984. She was designed by Esteban Vicente Jimenez to look like the Spanish vessels from the 1800s and built with the intention of circumnavigating the earth following the Magellan–Elcano route and then become a training ship.[2] Although she never did that trip and instead sailed around Spain for almost her 30 years, in 2013 Esteban’s nephew became her new skipper and decided to finally dedicate her to international sail training for both professionals and amateurs.

Source: Wikipedia

The Bluenose Visit Québec during RDV2017

The Bluenose
Bluenose was a fishing and racing schooner built in 1921 in Nova Scotia, Canada. A celebrated racing ship and fishing vessel, Bluenose under the command of Angus Walters became a provincial icon for Nova Scotia and an important Canadian symbol in the 1930s, serving as a working vessel until she was wrecked in 1946. Nicknamed the “Queen of the North Atlantic,” she was later commemorated by a replica, Bluenose II, built in 1963. The name Bluenose originated as a nickname for Nova Scotians from as early as the late 18th century.

Source: Wikipedia

Cavalier-du-moulin Park

The Cavalier-du-moulin Park

In 1663, Simon Denys of La Trinité built a mill on a rocky mound called Mount Carmel, on the site of the present Cavalier-du-Moulin park. In 1693, this mill is integrated into a defensive work called Cavalier. By bringing the line of fortifications back to the west in 1755, the rider lost his mill and strategic value at the same time.

A unique look over the Vieux-Québec
Source: City of Québec