Reenactment of military life in the 18th century

Reenactment of military life in the 18th century

On May 19 and 20, 2018, the Citadelle de Québec was the theater of a reenactment of military life in the 18th century with the École du soldat en Nouvelle-France.

For six years now, this activity has offered unique entertainment in an exceptional decor. It was an opportunity to revisit the French military heritage contained in the impressive fortress of Old Quebec.

For the 2018 edition, a record number passionate reenactors (more than 140!) Will offer you a glimpse of the life of a camp of soldiers of the 1750s in New France. In addition to military exercises, gunfire and skirmishes, no one will be immune to the smell of meals prepared over a wood fire. A real journey in time!

Plan already your arrival at the Citadette of Quebec on May 18 and 19, 2019.

Source: La Citadelle de Québec

The Marginal Way Therapy

The Marginal Way Therapy

One of our favorite summer getaway is Ogunquit, Maine. We have our routines. Breakfast at Amore with Leanne, some beach, good books and twice a day, a nice walk on the Marginal Way.

During summer 2011, my wife and I woke up early and we went to Perkins’ Cove for the sunrise which was quite promising. I took my 360° gear out of the trunk for a ride on the Marginal Way. We finally end up with more then 10 spherical panoramas of this amazing trail sculptured by time.

If an image worth a thousand words, this tour of the Marginal Way is… speachless! Enough words… Enjoy the Marginal Way Therapy.

 

An anthropologist runs a sugar shack

Forêt Vive Sugar Shack

Jean-Étienne Poirier, an amazing anthropologist, makes maple syrup with great skill.

Fortunately, I arrived well awake. As soon as we met, a ton of information came from his method to collect maple water, his way to calibrate his system so that the water transformed into syrup is a perfect 7°C higher than boiling water. Jean-Étienne explains how wood heating adds personality to his nectar, why he calibrates his system according to the atmospheric pressure, how he classifies his different batches which are tasted to great chefs, oenologists in order to describe the dominant flavors.

When I ask him what is in the stove of his wood stove, I am entitled to a eulogy imprinted with an enthusiasm on the virtues of the chaga, champion of mushrooms.

The benefits of chaga
This fungus helps to improve health and vitality. Rich in vitamin B, flavonoids, phenols, minerals and enzymes. So you say it’s gibberish, but chaga is the food that contains the most antioxidants (25%). Its high content of superoxide dismutase (an antioxidant enzyme) gives it a powerful action against the aging of the body. And like any superfood, it is nontoxic and has no side effects, which can be consumed by everyone, every day and at will. It is also a source of pantothenic acid, a vitamin essential to the well-being of the adrenal glands and digestive organs. source: Femme Actuelle

I went back to my studio with my photos but also richer of a new friend and a big chunk of chaga.

Submarine NCSM Onondaga

NCSM ONONDAGA

The Onondaga project is a project of the Pointe-au-Père Maritime Historical Site (SHMP), a museum located in Rimouski, Quebec, Canada, to convert HMCS Onondaga, a submarine of the Royal Canadian Navy, disarmed in June 2000. Launched by the Canadian War Museum (CWM) in 2000, the Onondaga conversion project was abandoned by the museum in 2002 due to a lack of funding. The SHMP, which has been interested in a museum submarine project since 2000, is conducting a feasibility study in 2003 demonstrating the potential for profitability of the project and acquired Onondaga in 2005.

In 2006, the SHMP began working with governments to finance the project and meet environmental requirements. It also identifies the submarine installation site, parallel to the Pointe-au-Père wharf. This choice entails an increase in installation costs, forcing the museum to reduce the concept of the exhibition and to develop a haulage method using a rail to reduce costs. The SHMP finally gets financial support from governments in early 2008.

Source: Wikipedia

Village of Percé

PERCÉ (the panorama of the Rocher Percé from the road stop is in high definition. Zoom in the picture)

Percé is a small city near the tip of the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec, Canada. Within the territory of the city there is a village community also called Percé.

Percé, member of the association of Most Beautiful Villages of Quebec, is mainly a tourist location particularly well known for the attractions of Percé Rock and Bonaventure Island.

In addition to Percé itself, the town’s territory also includes the communities of Barachois, Belle-Anse, Bougainville, Bridgeville, Cap-d’Espoir, Cannes-de-Roches, Coin-du-Banc, L’Anse-à-Beaufils, Pointe-Saint-Pierre, Rameau, Saint-Georges-de-Malbaie, and Val-d’Espoir.

Percé is the seat of the judicial district of Gaspé.

Source: Wikipedia

Bark Europe in Québec

The Europa is a steel-hulled barque registered in the Netherlands. Originally it was a German lightship, named Senator Brockes and built in 1911 at the H.C. Stülcken & Sohn shipyard in Hamburg, Germany. Until 1977, it was in use by the German Federal Coast Guard as a lightship on the river Elbe. A Dutchman bought the vessel (or what was left of her) in 1985 and in 1994 she was fully restored as a barque, a three-mast rigged vessel, and retrofitted for special-purpose sail-training.
Source: Wikipedia

Atyla at RDV2017 – Québec City

Tall ship Atyla is a two-masted wooden schooner handmade in Spain between 1980 and 1984. She was designed by Esteban Vicente Jimenez to look like the Spanish vessels from the 1800s and built with the intention of circumnavigating the earth following the Magellan–Elcano route and then become a training ship.[2] Although she never did that trip and instead sailed around Spain for almost her 30 years, in 2013 Esteban’s nephew became her new skipper and decided to finally dedicate her to international sail training for both professionals and amateurs.

Source: Wikipedia